2020-09-14: Monochrome Monday

I didn’t find it easy to see Chimanzees in Kibale Forest, or to photograph them. The dark forest and bright skylight mid morning made for some challenging contrast to overcome, but it was absolutely worth it.

Most of the images that I took weren’t great, but I did find a few that I hadn’t previously edited, and a monochrome treatment seemed a perfect solution to highlight these amazing animals in the best way that I can.

2020-09-13: Uganda Revisited

For the last few blog posts, I have been revisiting my journey through Uganda and editing some photos that I passed by the first go around. It’s been wonderful to review these images and relive the memories that I carry of that wonderful journey. Today and tomorrow will be the last of Uganda revisited, and after that, I am going to be moving on to revisiting my time in Kenya.

These images were taken at Queen Elizabeth National Park while staying at Ishasha Wilderness Lodge, along the Kazinga Channel while staying at Mweya Lodge, and in the Kibale Forest, where I stayed at Primate Lodge.

I hope you enjoy!

A yellow throated long claw seen in burnt vegetation along the side of the road, just after coming into Queen Elizabeth Park from Bwindi.
A beautiful sunset while on a game drive from Ishasha Lodge.
A leopard and a topi. This leopard has in fact taken the topi’s small fawn which was why she was standing and looking at the leopard so intensely.
A group of pied kingfisher seen while on a birding boat cruise. The number of pied kingfisher we saw was unbelievable, as they were nesting in the tall sand banks of the channel. They were there by the hundreds.
A woodland kingfisher see along the Kazinga Channel
Traditional boats along the Kazinga Channel.
A red-tailed monkey I spotted while walking around the grounds of Primate Lodge.
A malachite kingfisher seen while on a birding cruise along the Kazinga channel.
Toti the chimp telling our group what he really felt about us (assuming that means the same in chimp language!)

2020-09-07: Monochrome Monday

I felt a bit guilty sharing previously posted photos yesterday, so I edited a few more than usual for my monochrome Monday post today. These bring back such amazing memories for me. Baby gorillas are just the cutest.

Moving around the easy way!
Makes me think of the children’s rhyme “This little piggy went to market…”
One of my favourite images that I have taken so far. Such a beautiful moment to witness.
These youngster were all really precocious and some of the Moms just looked exhausted.

2020-09-06: Bwindi Highlights

I had the chance to get out for a round of golf when I originally planned to be editing images for this post. Given our lack of summer, and how soon winter will be upon us, any chance to be outside seems to be an opportunity well taken. So these images have been shared before, but are all moments from Bwindi that made me smile.

I hope you enjoy them!

2020-08-31: Monochrome Monday

Continuing on with East Africa images; this is a yellow baboon that I spotted on the side of road while driving between Queen Elizabeth National Park and Mweya Lodge near Kyambura Gorge. There were a few other baboons nearby, all foraging in the long grasses, but this one really caught my eye with the posture and turn of the head.

Another month starts tomorrow, let’s all make it a great one.

2020-08-30: Gorillas in Bwindi

Tomorrow, I’ll have a little pop up on Facebook that says “On this day 4 years ago” with a photo of a KLM airplane sitting at the gate. That flight would be the third leg on a solo journey that saw me travel Prince George to Vancouver, Vancouver to Calgary, Calgary to Amsterdam, Amsterdam to Kigali, and Kigali to Entebbe, to begin my journey around Uganda, and then onto Kenya from there. Planning and booking a trip like that, on my own, was a bit scary, but it was also a yes with every fibre of my being. Along the journey I met lovely people, saw things I had dreamt about for years and thoroughly enjoyed every minute of the adventure.

For the next few weeks I am going to explore images that I didn’t share at the time of the trip, and take the opportunity to relive some of that adventure. I do hope to have the opportunity to trek to see gorillas again in the future; it is an absolutely magical experience, and the tourism dollars from the treks are so vital to ensuring the survival of the mountain gorillas.

I hope you enjoy this trip down memory lane with me.

I’ve been using the face-palm emoji a lot lately, and when I scrolled by this image, I chuckled a bit.
Makara the silverback sitting with a couple of the juvenile gorillas.
Kids will be kids!

Have a great week everyone!

2019-10-27: Weaver Nests

I’ve been having fun this weekend working on some of my photo art images, but decided to share a few images of interesting weaver nests today.  They caught my eye, and I decided to just go with it.

On my most recent trip, we saw communal nests of the red-billed buffalo weaver and the typical hanging basket style nest of southern masked weaver (that’s my best guess, as we didn’t actually see anyone in residence).

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Loads of tiny basket style nests, abandoned for the season.

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These nests are built on the north and east branches of the tree; I believe in order to keep the nest cooler.  Our guide told us that this was one way to determine direction if you are lost out on the bush.

On previous trips I saw several other great examples.

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In Etosha National Park, the Sociable weaver nests had gotten so large, it brought down the branch of the tree.

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One of the many sociable weavers still in residence in the broken nest.

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In Amboseli National Park, another tree filled with the basket style nests of the weavers.  I don’t recall which variety would have bee the architects here.

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A black headed weaver gathering supplies to work on a nest in Queen Elizabeth Park in Uganda.