2018-02-25: Revisiting Old Work

During this month of revisiting old work, I’ve had the opportunity to take many trips down memory lane, remembering amazing moments in nature and the challenging times trying to work out what to do with my camera to make the image that appeared on my LCD match the thought I had in my head.

What this monthly topic has hammered home is that the gear doesn’t matter, its what you are able to do with it.  The software used to edit images doesn’t matter, its understanding how to make the tools work for you in the best ways possible.    These things get said time and time again, but they really become apparent when you start reviewing a collection of work gathered over time that has been captured and edited with a variety of different resources.

No one looking at my images is going to say “You shot that on this camera body and then you edited it with that software program.  There are times when I have been out shooting with more than one camera and once the images have been uploaded to my computer, I don’t know which image was shot with which body, without checking the info panel!

At the end of the day, the only thing that should matter is if the image moves you in some way.

And with that, here are a few images I have reworked this week.  I hope you enjoy, and please check back next Sunday to find out what the topic of the month will be for March.

A rhino with her calf seen while doing volunteer work with Wildlife Act in 2014.
Not a spectacular picture, but a fun memory for me. I took a day off work and went out shooting for a school project I was working on. It was a fine fall day so I took Spencer with me, and he was overjoyed at having the opportunity to dig in the sand next to the river. October 2013.
My first foray into Botswana included viewing elephants in the water from a boat. An amazing experience!  April 2013.
For my then and now image, I chose this wild dog lounging in the shade, seen while working with Wildlife Act in 2014.
Here is the now version of this image. I think I was much better able to highlight the texture of the fur compared to the original edit.  

Young elephant at the Chobe Rover

A young elephant drinks from the Chobe River in Botswana, under the protective shadow of her mother.  This little one had already lost her tail; whether it was missing at birth, or lost in an attack by a predator, only she knows.   It was amazing to spend time watching elephants; the antics of the little ones in the river brought us so much joy. 1/1000sec, f5.6, ISO560
A young elephant drinks from the Chobe River in Botswana, under the protective shadow of her mother. This little one had already lost her tail; whether it was missing at birth, or lost in an attack by a predator, only she knows.
It was amazing to spend time watching elephants; the antics of the little ones in the river brought us so much joy.
1/1000sec, f5.6, ISO560

African Pied Wagtail

This African Pied Wagtail most have gotten tired of flying, as it caught a ride on our boat during our river cruise along the Chobe. 1/1000sec, f4.8, ISO640
This African Pied Wagtail most have gotten tired of flying, as it caught a ride on our boat during our river cruise along the Chobe.
1/1000sec, f4.8, ISO640

Bee-Eaters

Beautiful Bee-eaters seen on a river cruise along the Chobe River. 1/200sec, f8.0, ISO360
Beautiful Bee-eaters seen on a river cruise along the Chobe River.
1/200sec, f8.0, ISO360

Wire-tailed Swallow

Along tag along on our river cruise!  This wire tailed swallow had built a nest somewhere on the boat itself. 1/1000sec, f4.8, ISO800
Along tag along on our river cruise! This wire tailed swallow had built a nest somewhere on the boat itself.
1/1000sec, f4.8, ISO800

African Pied Kingfisher

Decent photos of kingfishers elude me to this day!  This is as good as it gets, so far. An African Pied Kingfisher along the Chobe River. 1/400sec, f5.3, ISO100
Decent photos of kingfishers elude me to this day! This is as good as it gets, so far.
An African Pied Kingfisher along the Chobe River.
1/400sec, f5.3, ISO100

Blue-cheeked Bee-eaters

I couldn't have timed this better had I tried - I love the symmetry of their position and the shadows being cast by their beaks. 1/400sec, f5.6, ISO100
I couldn’t have timed this better had I tried – I love the symmetry of their position and the shadows being cast by their beaks.
1/400sec, f5.6, ISO100